Lolita, Light of My Life

 

As a lover of the publishing industry, I enjoy writing book reviews to guide readers to a deeper understanding of many books that feature uncomfortable topics. My aim is to show them the beauty of the seemingly disgusting, crude, taboo, and confusing writing of great artists. A great example of that is Lolita. Read the entry and decide for yourself:   Continue reading

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Happy Belated National Grammar Day

National Grammar Day was this past Sunday. And though I know grammar makes most people groan, I love it. And it lets people communicate, as they do in books! So, to help share the love, I’ve gathered some funny grammar sites to show grammar’s awesomeness. Continue reading

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The Book of Daniel: He’s No Saint

No, I’m not reviewing the biblical Book of Daniel. This book by E.L. Doctorowis anything but holy. But that’s what makes it compelling. Doctorow leads readers through the lives of two children who are living in the McCarthy era. But these children are based on the infamous Rosenberg family.

Doctorow shows the human side of the Rosenberg story and causes readers to think about what could have been done differently. Photo from University of Missouri Kansas City website

The story is written in the form of a jumbled historical dissertation. The main character and son of two suspected Communists, Daniel, chronicles the events of his life to obtain his PhD. But instead of reading like a textbook, Daniel’s story expands to cover the rollercoaster of his childhood when his parents were taken, the eventual decline of his sister, and the emotional problems he developed later in life because of the trauma. Continue reading

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Fahrenheit 451: A Hot Read

Imagine a world in which censorship rules, firefighters start the fires, and you wouldn’t even be allowed to read this harmless post.

Spooky, right? That’s just the thrill Ray Bradbury intends for his readers. I love this book despite the fact that it presents a frighteningly realistic scenario. It follows the story of a firefighter, Guy Montag, whose job it is to burn any found book. The government has denied anyone access to books to keep citizens in ignorance and under their control. Continue reading

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On the Road: Drive Away, Kerouac

I'm sure Kerouac's words spoke intimately to readers of another generation. I'm just not one of those readers. Photo by Tompalumbo via Flickr

This book is said to have changed the lives of countless readers. I felt no such epiphany.

I read Jack Kerouac’s famous novel for an American Literature class recently. Even before the second chapter, I was unimpressed. Within a few more chapters, I was yelling at the book as though I could chastise it into being more insightful. Continue reading

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Zeitoun: The Power of the Narrative

His name is pronounced [zeh-TUNE]. And yes, the title of this novel is the last name of its main character, Abdulrahman Zeitoun.

I guess I shouldn’t say character as Zeitoun is a real man who experienced Hurricane Katrina at her full fury. This is another news-report-turned-novel, just like Methland. Its author, Dave Eggers, takes Zeitoun’s heart-wrenching and often infuriating account of Katrina and molds it into an emphatic narrative. He describes the journey of the Syrian-American Zeitoun caught in the panicked grip of American overprotection. Continue reading

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Methland: So far, [It’s] So Good

It’s always the ones you don’t expect.

Currently, I’m reading Methland by Nick Reding, and boy, the things I didn’t expect. I’m only on Part One so far, but my stereotype of small towns has been demolished because of this novel. When I thought of people making, selling and buying drugs, I’ve always thought of big cities; Methland and the little town of Oelwein changed my perspective. Continue reading

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